Matairangi Mahi Toi
Artist Residency at Government House

Established by Governor General Sir Jerry Mateparae, the honour of this sovereign residency is deeply valued and acknowledged. It is marked with mana and distinction as it supports the development of visual art and creative practice.

Lindah Lepou

2017 resident Lindah Lepou with Dame Patsy Reddy and Sir David Gascoigne

Lindah Lepou's work shown at the Government House Ballroom, 2017.

Lindah Lepou's work shown at the Government House Ballroom, 2017.

Horomona Horo

Horomona Horo, tohunga taonga pūoro and 2018 resident

The residency was created by Toi Rauwhārangi in partnership with the office of the Governor General, to support the development of Māori and Pasifika visual arts and creative practices. There are up to three residencies per year.

Artists can live and work in a house in the grounds of Government House.

This residency aims to:

  • Build and strengthen the relationship between tangata whenua and Toi Rauwhārangi.
  • Develop strategic plans for creative research excellence and academic leadership for Māori in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  • Generate cultural pathways for and between Massey University and Toi Rauwhārangi.

 

Matairangi Mahi Toi residents

2016—Ross Hemera

2017—Lindah Lepou

2018—Rosanna Raymond

2018—Horomona Horo

The name for the residency was gifted to Toi Rauwhārangi and Government House by Professor Ross Hemera.

Matairangi

Matairangi is a prominent peak in Wellington with an expansive vista of the city and surrounding countryside. It has a rich heritage and history connected to the formation mythologies of Te Whanganui a Tara, Queen Victoria in the 1840s and, by 1910, Government House. Matairangi also refers to a hilltop lookout and vantage point.

Mahi Toi

The creative practice and artistic skills of the artist are pursued in the name of excellence. The vision of the artist is an expression of human dignity for us all to wonder and enjoy.

An Oamaru stone sculpture, carved by the inaugural recipient of the residency, retired Professor Ross Hemera, and celebrating his Ngāi Tahu and South Island whakapapa, was unveiled in 2016.

An Oamaru stone sculpture, carved by the inaugural recipient of the residency, retired Professor Ross Hemera, and celebrating his Ngāi Tahu and South Island whakapapa, was unveiled in 2016.

Governor-General Sir Jerry Mateparae, far left; Chancellor Chris Kelly; Professor Ross Hemera; and Associate Pro Vice-Chancellor of the College of Creative Arts, Professor Tony Parker.

Te Ara Toroa — Rere Ki Uta, Rere Ki Tai
The flight of the albatross — Venturing into the unknown
Design by Ngataiharuru Taepa, Kaihautu Toi Māori—Director of Māori Arts

Toi Rauwhārangi
College of Creative Arts
Wellington, Aotearoa

massey