Caroline Campbell

Caroline Campbell

Senior lecturer, Ngā Pae Māhutonga - The School of Design; First year coordinator, College of Creative Arts

Dr. Caroline Campbell is an illustrator, visual arts historian and emerging graphic artist who works and researches in the field of children’s and young adult literature. She focuses on the role and work of the graphic artist and illustrator in representing socio-political and environmental issues. Campbell teaches across the BDes(Hons) and co-supervises students in the MDes and doctoral programmes.

  • Expertise

    Children’s and young adult illustration; semiotic theory; theories of representation.

  • Research Highlights

    Campbell, C. Red Dot Award: Communication Design 2015 (Berlin).
    The multimodal, screened book Josie and the Whales was selected from 7,451 entries from 53 countries and assessed by an international jury of notable designers, respected professors and specialist journalists from 13 countries.  

    Campbell, C. (2015). Josie and the Whales. iTunes.
    Josie and the Whales is a multimodal, screened book for children and young adult readers. Designed for digital reading, the published book tells of how a young female protagonist with special powers joins forces with the creatures and elements of the Southern Ocean to protect the blue whales from slaughter by a whaling fleet. The eco-fantasy is located in Aotearoa New Zealand and Antarctica and is conveyed through non-verbal sequential art and ambient sound.

    Campbell, C. (2014). Josie and the Whales: A graphic narrative.
    A curated exhibition of 59 dip pen and Indian ink line illustrations, hand drawn on 210x297mm Magnani Art paper at the Wellington-based community gallery, Thistle Hall.

    Campbell, C. (2013). She rides astride: Mateship, morality and the Out-back colonial girl. Australasian Journal of Victorian Studies, 18(1), 28-39.
    She rides astride: Mateship, morality and the Outback-colonial girl is a scholarly article published in the Australian Journal of Victorian Studies. The article was developed subsequent to oral presentation at an international, cross-disciplinary conference on colonial girls and colonial girlhood. It argues that the illustrative representation of Out-back girls in Australia’s national children’s literature provided readers with a gendered model equal to masculine adventure types.

    Campbell, C. (2012). Beneath the ice-floes: Imaging gender, fear and safety in Antarctic literature for young adults. International Research in Children’s Literature, 5(2), 151-166.
    Beneath the ice-floes: Imaging gender, fear and safety in Antarctic literature for young adults is a scholarly article published in the journal, International Research in Children’s Literature. The article was developed subsequent to oral presentation at the Australasian Children’s Literature Association for Research. In it Campbell applies an illustrator’s perspective and eco-theory to interrogate the adventure and magical realist representation of Antarctica, and Antarctic eco-warriors and types. 

    Campbell, C. (2010). Celestial gardeners and peripatetic salesmen. In S. Chakravorty & A. Gupta (Eds.), New world order: Transnational themes in book history (pp. 102-131). Delhi, India: Worldview Publications.
    Celestial gardeners and peripatetic salesmen is a chapter in a conference proceedings publication. The essay was developed subsequent to oral presentation at an international conference on transnational themes in book history. It argues that the representation of diaspora, Australian Aborigines and Australian Out-back types by little-known immigrant graphic artist, John MacFarlane, was contingent on White Policy and the European fear of degeneracy.

    Campbell, C. (2011). Turning the viewing device around: A critical approach to drawing as design research. Anti-po-des, 1(1), 45-52.
    Turning the viewing device around: A critical approach to drawing as design research is a practice-based article published in the online design journal, Anti-po-des. The author-illustrated article argues for the critical relevance of self-reflexive techniques, the discovery-led poetic and projective drawing in design thinking and information gathering.

  • Qualifications

    Dip VCD (Wellington Polytechnic)
    MDes (Massey University)
    PhD (Victoria University)

  • Supervision

    Dinah Vincent
    Dressmaking in New Zealand, 1945 to 1965

    In-progress

    Primary supervisor: Prof. Vicki Karaminas
    Co-supervisor: Dr. Bronwyn Labrum
    Co-supervisor: Dr. Caroline Campbell